Home Laboratory QuizzesHaematology Quizzes [MCQs] Manual Cell Counts Quiz – Part 1 (25 test)

[MCQs] Manual Cell Counts Quiz – Part 1 (25 test)

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Manual Cell Counts - Part 1

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See all quizzes of  the Manual Cell Counts  at here:

Part 1 (25 test) | Part 2 (25 test – end)  

II. Preview all questions below

1. For a WBC count, after drawing blood into the diluting pipet, it is necessary to wipe any excess blood from the outside of the pipet in order to avoid:

  1. Wasting cells.
  2. Dirtying the pipet.
  3. Dirtying the hemacytometer cover glass.
  4. Transferring cells to the diluting fluid.

2. When doing a WBC count, to what mark should the diluting fluid be drawn?

  1. 3.
  2. 7.
  3. 11.
  4. 13.

3. When performing a WBC count, which reagents may be used as dilutants?

  1. Acetic acid or sulfuric acid.
  2. Acetic acid or citric acid.
  3. Acetic acid or hydrochloric acid.
  4. Acetic acid or trisphosphoric acid.

4. For the WBC count, immediately after the contents of the pipet have been mixed for about three minutes, it is necessary to:

  1. Use a mechanical mixer.
  2. Expel three to four drops.
  3. Observe for even distribution of cells.
  4. Refill both chambers of the hemacytometer.

5. After the WBCs have settled for about three minutes during a manual WBC count, which powered magnification and lighting arrangements are used to focus on the ruled area to observe for even distribution of WBC?

  1. Low-power (10X); reduced light.
  2. High-power (43X); bright light.
  3. Oil immersion (97X); bright light.
  4. High-power (43X); reduced light.

6. When counting WBCs, a variation of more than cells between any of the four areas counted or a variation of more than cells between sides of the hemacytometer indicate uneven distribution and require that the procedure be

  1. 6; 12.
  2. 7; 9.
  3. 10; 20
  4. 10; 18.

7. Why is the pipet held upright immediately after drawing the diluting fluid to the 11″ mark and mixing it with the specimen?

  1. To indicate a “snake-like” line.
  2. To wash the blood.
  3. To dilute the blood better.
  4. To prevent air bubbles in the bulb.

8. Which WBCs are counted?

  1. Those touching the inner left-hand bottom lines.
  2. All WBCs outside the squares.
  3. All WBCs within the square and those touching the upper and right hand center lines.
  4. All WBCs within the square and those touching the upper and left- hand center lines.

9. How many 1-sq-mm comer areas and chambers are used to count WBCs?.

  1. 3; 4.
  2. 4; 2.
  3. 2; 6.

10. Which chemical is mixed with whole blood when obtaining a WBC count?

  1. Sodium chloride.
  2. Weak acid.
  3. Weak base.
  4. Calcium carbonate.

11. Blood is drawn to the mark and diluted to the                                           mark for a WBC count.

  1. 0.5, 10.
  2. 0.1,20.
  3. 0.5, 11.
  4. 0.10, 20 .

12. The usual blood dilution for the manual WBC count is:

  1. 1:10.
  2. 1:20.
  3. 1:100.
  4. 1:200.

13. The volume is the:

  1. Area X width.
  2. Width X length.
  3. Width X depth.
  4. Area X depth.

14. Using the hemacytometer counting chamber, the formula for calculating the WBC count is:

  1. Average number of WBCs counted x Dilution / Volume = WBCs per cu mm
  2. Average number of WBCs counted x Dilution / Volume = WBCs per sq in
  3. Average number of WBCs counted x Volume Dilution / Volume = WBCs per cu mm
  4. Average number of WBCs per cu mm x WBCs  counted / Volume = Dilution

15. If blood is drawn to the “0.5” mark on a WBC diluting pipet, and diluting fluid to the “11” mark, what is the WBC count of the patient if the average of two chamber counts is 163?

  1. 3,260 WBCs per cu mm.
  2. 8,530 WBCs per cu mm.
  3. 8,150 WBCs per cu mm.
  4. 10,320 WBCs per cu mm.

16. If blood is drawn to the “0.5” mark on a WBC diluting pipet, and diluting fluid to the “11” mark, what is the WBC count of the patient if the average of two chamber counts is 214?

  1. 4,280 WBCs per cu mm.
  2. 8,350 WBCs per cu mm.
  3. 9,984 WBCs per cu mm.
  4. 10,700 WBCs per cu mm.

17. If blood is drawn to the “0.5” mark on a WBC diluting pipet, and diluting fluid to the “11” mark, what is the WBC count of the patient if the average of two chamber counts is 198?

  1. 3,960 WBCs per cu mm.
  2. 9,900 WBCs per cu mm.
  3. 9,984 WBCs per cu mm.
  4. 10,540 WBCs per cu mm.

18. What is the maximum allowable error rate when using the four large hemacytometer squares in the WBC count?

  1. 10 percent.
  2. 15 percent.
  3. 20 percent.
  4. 25 percent.

19. What is the maximum allowable error rate for the manual WBC count when 8 square areas are employed?

  1. 10 percent.
  2. 15 percent.
  3. 20 percent.
  4. 25 percent.

20. When performing a WBC count, what is done when the whitecell count is exceptionally reduced as in the case of leukopenia?

  1. The dilution should be made in the red blood cell diluting pipet.
  2. The blood is drawn to the “1.0” mark and the diluting fluid is drawn to the “11” mark. The resulting dilution is 1:100.
  3. The white pipet should be filled to the “1.0” mark and diluted to the “11” mark with two percent acetic acid. The resulting dilution is 1:10.
  4. The count is corrected calculating the observed count x 100divided by 100 + the percent of nucleated erythrocytes.

21. When performing a WBC count, what is done when the whitecell count is exceptionally high as in the case of leukemia?

  1. The dilution should be made in the red blood cell diluting pipet. The blood is drawn to the “1.0” mark and the diluting fluid is drawn to the “101” mark. The resulting dilution is 1:100.
  2. The white pipet should be filled to the “1.0” mark and diluted to the “11” mark with 2 percent acetic acid. The resulting dilution is 1:10.
  3. The count is corrected calculating the observed count x 100 divided by 100 + the percent of nucleated erythrocytes.
  4. Add 10 percent of the count to the total number of cells counted + the percent of nucleated erythrocytes.

22. If blood for a WBC count is drawn to the “1.0” mark on a RBC diluting pipet, and diluting fluid to the “101” mark, what is the WPC count of the patient if the average of two chamber counts is 356?

  1. 22,250 WBCs per cu mm.
  2. 44,500 WBCs per cu mm.
  3. 89,000 WBCs per cu mm.
  4. 178,000 WBCs per cu mm.

23. If blood for a WBC count is drawn to the “1.0” mark on an RBC diluting pipet, and diluting fluid is drawn to the “101” mark, what is the WBC count if the average of two chamber counts is 290?

  1. 72,500 WBCS per cu mm.
  2. 145,000 WBCs per cu mm.
  3. 217,500 WBCs per cu mm.
  4. 362,500 WBCs per cu mm.

24. If blood is drawn to the “1.0” mark on a WBC diluting pipet, and diluting fluid to the “11” mark, what is the WBC count of the patient if the average of two chamber counts is 153?

  1. 3,825 WBCs per cu mm.
  2. 7,650 WBCs per cu mm.
  3. 38,250 WBCs per cu mm.
  4. 76,500 WBCS per cu mm.

25. If the WBC count is 10,210 and the differential indicates there are 19 nucleated RBCs per 100 WBCs, what is the corrected WBC count?

  1. 8,650.
  2. 8,580.
  3. 9,580.
  4. 1,021,000.

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